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Years ago, I had a favorite type of hair clip (barrette.)  It held tight, didn’t pull or rip my hair, and adjusted to accommodate any portion of my hair I wanted to clip back.  I bought them individually and payed at least several dollars each, but they were so worth it.

More recently I have found the same type of clip in bulk packaging in craft stores.

Package of 20 large barrettes for $4.99 at Hobby Lobby

Package of 20 large barrettes for $4.99 at Hobby Lobby

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Three pieces assemble easily in just a few seconds when your design is fastened.

They’re “unfinished” and come in three sizes.  They actually disassemble very easily so you can design them however you desire but they don’t break or come apart when they’re not supposed to.

With your choice of wire, a needle and thread, or hot glue you are in business.  Beads, buttons, needlework, yarn, sequins, fabric, ribbons, and feathers. . . the sky is the limit on what you can do with them.  Here are a few designs I’ve made with them.

These clips were made from "friendship bracelet" cording I made with various bright cotton or wool yarn on a foam "wheel."  I then sewed them into the swirled or zig-zag shapes (think of how braided rugs are sewn together.)

These clips were made from “friendship bracelet” cording I made with various bright cotton or wool yarn on a foam “wheel.” I then sewed them into the swirled or zig-zag shapes (think of how braided rugs are sewn together.)

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To see a tutorial on how to use the wheel, check HERE.

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Buttons and pearl beads are secured with fine wire on this barrette.  When I use wire I always twist the ends and dab with a little hot glue to cover the sharp ends.

Buttons and pearl beads are secured with fine wire on this barrette. When I use wire I always twist the ends and dab with a little hot glue to cover the sharp ends.

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These were made with a beading loom.  With the threads still attached, I wove them around the clip and through each row of beads to secure them tightly to the barrette.

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I made these fabric “yo-yos,” tacked them together on the back, secured buttons in their centers, and sewed them to the barrette.

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These are made with shiny crochet cotton using a size D crochet hook with the afghan stitch (tunisian crochet.) Tiny buttons and green needlepoint leaves finished them off.

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This is also crocheted using #10 crochet cotton and a size D hook in the single crochet thermal stitch, a crocheted flower, and randomly placed pearl beads.

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I used very thin wire to thread these beads and attach them to the clips as I went along.  These were some of the first experiments I made, and I’m thinking of re-doing them, especially since I took a look at THIS beading pattern.

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The beads were worked with fine wire, wrapping it around the barrette to secure it as I went along. The sequins were attached with a needle and transparent plastic thread to cording that had previously been attached by needle and thread to the barrette.

Heart patterned filet crochet doily like the one I used for the barrette

Heart patterned filet crochet doily like the one I used for the barrette

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This is a filet crochet style doily I made and cinched up in the center, tacking it to the barrette with a needle and matching white crochet cotton.

I made this frilly crochet design with a base pattern of filet crochet, then double crocheted in a zig-zag pattern through it.

I made this frilly crochet design with a base pattern of filet crochet (the open stitch) then double crocheted in a zig-zag pattern around it.  Notice the difference in size between the large (blue, burgundy, and navy) and the medium (lavendar.)

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